What is Bedwetting?

Most commonly found in young children, bedwetting (also known as enuresis, nocturnal enuresis, primary enuresis, and diurnal enuresis) is a sleep disorder caused by an undeveloped or stressed nervous system and/or urinary system. It is the result of both the nervous system and urinary system involuntarily releasing urine during the night hours while the child is in a deep sleep. Since it is a problem that seemingly only occurs during the night and while the child is asleep, it has been appropriately labeled as a sleep disorder.

Types of Bedwetting

Primary Nocturnal: A child who has never been dry for more than a few months at a time.

Secondary Nocturnal Enuresis: A child who has been completely dry for more than 6 months and then starts to wet the bed again. An emotional event or social changes or constipation may trigger this kind of bedwetting.

Causes of Bedwetting

Research shows that bedwetting is an inherited problem rather than a suddenly developed issue or sign of bodily trauma. This is why the problem is less common in adolescents. Being inherited, bedwetting is discovered early on within the first five or six years of a young person’s life. Only in rare cases is bed wetting caused by a non-sleep related problem, and in those cases, the culprit is usually some sort of urinary tract infection.

Bedwetting could be associated with constipation, urge incontinence (being unable to hold on when the child feels the urge to pass urine) or a stop and start urine stream associated with dribbling of urine after voiding.

Bedwetting Facts

Bedwetting usually happens during a type of sleep in which other things like sleep walking and sleep talking occur, particularly in younger children. The precise cause is unknown; however, here are some bedwetting facts.

  • The waking response is not fully developed in all children that wet the bed.
  • 60% of children who wet the bed produce more urine during sleep than other children.
  • The amount of urine the bladder holds may be less than children who don’t wet the bed.
  • Fluid restriction in the evening doesn’t prevent the episode from occurring.
  • Because it happens during sleep the child has no conscious control over it.
  • Bedwetting affects half as many girls as it affects boys.
  • Chances of a child bedwetting are increased by 40 per cent if one of the parents was bedwetter.

When Bedwetting is a Concern?

Bedwetting affects 7 million American children. Most children wet the bed every now and then, however, if a child continues bedwetting after the age of five (in males) and four (in females) parents should become concerned and consider using treatment option such as the Chummie Bedwetting Alarm.

 

 

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